Photo © The Israel Museum, Jerusalem
Jackson Pollock
American, 1912-1956
Horizontal Composition
Oil and enamel on canvas mounted on composition board
25.4 x 309.6 cm
Gift of Sylvia and Joseph Slifka, New York, to American Friends of the Israel Museum
© The Pollock-Krasner Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York
Accession number: B03.0826
 
 
Jackson Pollock, a leading exponent of Abstract Expressionism, is best known for his "drip" or "action" paintings of 1947-1951. To produce these works, Pollock spread large canvases on the floor of his barn studio and used brushes, sticks, and even turkey-basters to pour, fling, and drip the paint onto the surface. This technique, which evolved from Surrealist automatic drawing, results in a borderless composition of interpenetrating lines; a space in which there is no differentation between top and bottom, inside and out.

Horizontal Composition, an extremely elongated painting, apparently cut from a larger composition, seems to extend into infinite space. Three colors are poured onto a rust-colored background, forming a finely entangled web. Blue and black swirls interwine and bleed into one another, and are delicately threaded with a white enamel overlay. The careful distribution of light and dark conveys a sense of depth and vitality.

Publications:
Kamien-Kazhdan, Adina, Surrealism and Beyond in the Israel Museum, Jerusalem, 2007
Kamien-Kazhdan, Adina (ed.), Modernism in Dialogue: 20th-Century Painting and Sculpture in the Israel Museum, The Israel Museum, Jerusalem, 2010

Exhibition:
Dada Surrealism and Beyond in the Israel Museum, 2007
Surrealism and Beyond in the Israel Museum, Weisbord Exhibition Pavilion, February - June 2007, Israel Museum, Jerusalem

Digital presentation of this object was made possible by: Ms. Joan Lessing, New York and Jerusalem