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Proposals for a state emblem submitted in response to a competition announced by the Provisional Council
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November 12 1953
Proposals for the emblem On June 7, 1948, the Provisional Government held a discussion regarding the design of the state flag and emblem. The next day, an announcement was published in the papers asking citizens to offer suggestions for the emblem and flag. The announcement provided the following guidelines as to the colors of the emblem; they would be "light blue and white, and any additional color, according to the discretion of the artist. At its center, the emblem would have a seven-branched Menorah and seven six-point stars." Approximately 150 proposals were submitted to the "Emblem and Flag Committee", which was established specifically for this purpose. They came from citizens representing all sectors of the population. At the meeting of the Provisional Government on July 11, 1948, Moshe Shertok, who later changed his name to Moshe Sharett, suggested that the emblem should also include olive branches. David Ben-Gurion expressed the opinion that the emblem should bear the image of a lion, or perhaps two rampant lions holding up the Two Tablets of the Law. Even though the Emblem and Flag Committee had already decided on the seven-branched Menorah as the state emblem, an additional committee session was conducted to discuss whether the lion should be chosen instead. In the end, the committee members voted to keep the Menorah as the state emblem after all. On July 15, the Provisional Council of State convened to discuss the government proposal, and finally rejected it. The council appointed an emblem and flag committee of its own to choose an emblem. At the meeting of the Provisional Council of State held on October 14, 1948, two proposals presented by the emblem and flag committee were considered: the first, an emblem with a Menorah surrounded by seven stars, along with the inscription Shalom al Yisrael or "Peace on Israel"; and the second, a Menorah encircled with a lulav, an etrog, and a shofar. The members of the Provisional Council of State voiced fierce opposition to both proposals. At the next session of the Council, it was decided to return the issue to the committee. On November 12, the emblem and flag committee decided to engage the general public in the discussion surrounding the symbol, and once again published an announcement in the newspapers inviting submissions. One hundred and thirty-one people took part in the competition. The committee chose a proposal submitted by graphic artist Maxim Shamir, but requested that a few specific modifications be made. On January 10, the committee decided that the seven-branched Menorah be modeled after the one that appears on Titus's Arch in Rome. Once Maxim Shamir had modified his proposed emblem in accordance with its requests, the committee decided, on February 7, 1949, to submit the modified proposal to the Provisional Council of State. On February 10, 1949, the Provisional Council of State approved the official Emblem of the State of Israel.
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National State Archives
 
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