Languages

Accessibility

Interface

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Visitor Info

Accessibility

We strive to make the Museum as accessible as possible for disabled visitors
  • Marked handicapped parking is available near the main entrance to the Museum, and the Second Temple Model.
  • An audio system for the hearing-impaired is available at ticket counters.
  • Counters are wheelchair accessible.
  • Discounts on admission to holders of a disabled identification card.
  • Discounts on admission to wheelchair users (admission is free to an escort).
  • Free admission to blind and visually impaired visitors and their escort.
The Campus
  • Entrance to the Museum and interior passages are wheelchair accessible.
  • Wheelchairs and lockers are available in the entrance pavilion.
  • A cloakroom and folding chairs are available near the elevators.
  • A transit vehicle for four is available to those who have difficulty walking through the Route of Passage.
  • Elevators, stair lifts, and ramps are available in the various galleries (* there is no Shabbat elevator)
  • Museum’s restaurants and shops are wheelchair accessible.
  • Maps in various languages are available (details at the Information Desk).
  • Wheelchair accessible stalls are available in rest rooms.
Art Garden
* The Art Garden is inaccessible to wheelchair users (observation points overlook the garden).
Visitor Info

Events All Events

Family Activities

My Family and other Animals

Guided Tours

Modern Art

Family Activities

Maybe, Maybe Not: How Do You Say That in Chinese?

Guided Tours

Ai Weiwei Maybe, Maybe Not

Visitor Info

Opening Hours

Rosh Hashanah
Thurs 21.9 10 am - 5 pm
Fri 22.9 10 am - 2 pm

Yom Kippur
Fri - Sat 29-30.9 closed

Sukkot
5-13.10 Free entrance for children under 18 courtesy of the Ernst and Jaqueline Weill Stiftung, Zurich

Free entrance for soldiers doing compulsory military service and for those doing National Service, courtesy of Israeli Friends of the Israel Museum

Free entrance for children under 18 (excluding groups and workshops) on Tues and Sat thoughout the year, courtesy of the Canadian Friends of the Israel Museum and David and Inez Myers, Cleveland, Ohio

Rockefeller Museum is closed on Tues, Fri, and Holiday Eves
Ticho House is closed on Saturdays

 

Visitor Info

Locations

Ticho House
Sun, Mon, Tues, Thurs 10 am – 5 pm
Wed 10 am – 9 pm
Fri and Holiday Eves 10 am – 2 pm
Sat closed.
10 HaRav Agan Street
Tel: 645 3746,
ticho@imj.org.il
Rockefeller Museum
Sun, Mon, Wed, Thurs 10 am – 3 pm
Sat 10 am – 2 pm
Closed Tues, Fri and Holiday Eves
27 Sultan Suleiman St.
Tel: 628 2251
fawziib@imj.org.il
Visitor Info

Campus Map

Museum Gallery Map
Visitor Info

Directions and Transportation

Find Us
The Israel Museum is located in Jerusalem on 11 Ruppin Boulevard, Hakyria, near the Knesset (Israeli Parliament).
The Israel Museum, Jerusalem
POB 71117
Jerusalem, 9171002
Israel
Tel: 972-2-670-8811
Fax: 972-2-677-1332
Transportation
By Bus
Bus lines: 7, 9, 14, 35, 66
Direct from Tel Aviv, line 100 from Shapirim Junction Parking
Information and schedules »
or dial Kol Kav *8787
By Car
Parking for cars and bicycles outside the Museum
GPS - Avraham Granot Street
WAZE - Israel Museum
Parking available for Museum visitors. Limited number of parking spaces.
Museum visitors are requested to retain entrance tickets, or receipts from Museum stores, or restaurants for presentation at the exit booth of the parking lot.
Ticho House
10 HaRav Agan Street, Jerusalem
Free entrance 
Tel: 02 645-3746 
email: ticho@imj.org.il
The Rockefeller Museum
POB 71117
91710 Jerusalem 
email: fawziib@imj.org.il
Tel: for groups: 02 670-8074
Fax: 02 670-8063
Visitor Info

Dining

Modern
Modern, the Museum's kosher meat restaurant, is designed in an early modernist style. It offers contemporary Jerusalem cuisine and a rich collection of quality wines. Adjoining a plaza and overlooking the Valley of the Cross, this restaurant specializes in hosting private and business events. 
Modern is kosher meat, under the supervision of the Chief Rabbinate of Jerusalem. Dining in the restaurant does not require purchase of an admissions ticket to the Museum. Museum members and Friends of the Israel Museum are entitled to a 10% discount. 
Parking is free and the restaurant is accessible to all. 
Open: Sun, Mon, Wed,Thurs from 11:30 am - 5 pm, Tues 11:30 am - 11 pm, Fri 10 am - 2 pm 
For inquiries: 02 648-0862.
To arrange events: 054-778-8558; 054-304-0279; events@modern.co.il 
See Modern's website »
 

Mansfeld
Mansfeld, the Museum's dairy cafés, are named after Al Mansfeld, the first architect of the Israel Museum and winner of the Israel Prize for Architecture for his design of the Museum. The café's rich menu includes home-baked goods, cakes, sandwiches, salads and hot dishes. The café is suitable for hosting private events.
Mansfeld is kosher dairy under the supervision of the Chief Rabbinate of Jerusalem. 
Dining in the café does not require purchase of an admissions ticket to the Museum. Museum members and Friends of the Israel Museum are entitled to a 10% discount. 
Parking is free and the restaurant is accessible to all. 
Open: Sun, Mon, Wed, Thurs 8 am - 5 pm | Tues 8 am - 9 pm | Fri 8 am - 2 pm. 
For inquiries: 02 563-6280; Fax: 02 561-8399; cafe@mansfeld.co.il
To arrange events: 054-884-7133 or 050-997-8800
See Mansfeld's website »
 


Chic Café
Chic Café is a dairy café located at the entrance to the Model of Jerusalem in the Second Temple Model. The menu includes fine coffee and cold drinks, sandwiches, salads (soups in the winter), cakes, ice cream and snacks. 
Dining in the café does not require purchase of an admissions ticket to the Museum. Museum members and Friends of the Israel Museum are entitled to a 10% discount. 
Parking is free and the restaurant is accessible to all. 
Open Sun Mon Wed Thurs 8 am - 5 pm; Tues 8 am - 6 pm; Fri 8 am - 2 pm, Sat 8 am - 5 pm 
Cafe Tel: 02 633-2555, yossi.stark@gmail.com
 

Anna Italian Café 

Ticho House
10 HaRav Agan Street
Sun – Thurs 1 pm – 11pm 
Fri 12 pm – 3pm 
Kosher dairy, Jerusalem Rabbinate 
Tel: 02 543-4144 
host@annarest.co.il

Visitor Info

Services

Museum Information
Please feel free to contact Museum Information with any questions.
Tel: 02 670-8811 info@imj.org.il
Cloakroom and folding chairs
A cloakroom and folding chairs are available at the end of the Route of Passage, next to the elevators. Please inquire at the Information Desk.
Wheelchairs and disabled access
Wheelchairs are available in the Entrance Pavilion. Please inquire at the Information Desk for details. Much of the Israel Museum is wheelchair-accessible, and an ongoing renovation program continues to improve access for the disabled. Wheelchair-accessible places include the entrance pavilion, the Shrine of the Book, and the Model of Jerusalem in the Second Temple Period. Download the PDF accessibility map of the campus. Accessibility in the Museum »
Parking
Parking available for Museum visitors. Limited number of parking spaces. Museum visitors are requested to retain entrance tickets, or receipts from Museum stores or restaurants for presentation at the exit booth of the parking lot. Bicycle parking Available in the entrance plaza of the Museum
Audio guides
Audio guides for some permanent exhibitions in selected languages are included in the Museum entrance fee and are available at the Entrance Pavilion. The exhibitions include: The Shrine of the Book, the Second Temple Model and the Art Garden. Audio guides are also appropriate for hearing impaired visitors.
Visitor Info

Museum Stores

Shop online

We are committed to bringing you the best that Israel has to offer. Whether you’re looking for exquisite jewelry made with materials unique to Israel, organic farm-fresh preserves, world-renowned Dead Sea skincare or home décor from internally acclaimed Israeli artists, we’ll send it to you straight from Israel.

Go Shopping »

Take the Museum experience home with you

Everyone buys gifts, but only at the Israel Museum shops do they come with a story. Each story reveals a new, and exciting world - all inspired by from the vast and unique collections of the Museum, from both the permanent exhibitions and special exhibitions. Discover the story behind specially-produced articles to make your your Museum experience linger on.

* Special benefits and discounts for Museum Members and an additional 10% discount on all products.

Be inspired
Discover items inspired by the Shrine of the Book, the Ahava (Love) sculpture from the Art Garden, a wide range of Judaica items; Hanukkah menorahs, wine cups, candlesticks, and more. Choose from the many children's products, as well as the exclusive and distinctive jewelry created by top Israeli and international designers.
Museum Stores
The three stores are located: at the entrance to the Second Temple Model, on the central cardo of the Museum opposite the Bella and Harry Wexner Gallery, and the main store in the entrance pavilion. No entrance fee required to the main store and parking is free!
Israel Museum Products, Ltd.
Israel Museum Products, Ltd. is an Israel Museum commercial corporation which operates three stores on the Museum campus. The company holds exclusive rights to create products for the Israel Museum inspired by the Museum's collection of unique items and temporary exhibitions. The company is committed to the inclusion of disadvantaged sectors, both in its stores and among workers involved in the product development and manufacture, in cooperation with various foundations and the Ministry of Economy and Industry. Special benefits and discounts for Museum Members and an additional 10% discount on all products.
Visitor Info

Members

Become a Member
For annual Membership fees »
Sign up online »
Benifits, discounts and special activities
Check the Member's Page for ongoing Membership benefits: exhibitions pre-openings just for members, special lectures, guided tours in the Museum and at other cultural institutions, discounts and more.
Give a Museum Membership to those you love - the gift that people love to get.
Purchase a membership for a friend and gain an additional month on your own membership for free. Please call for more details Tel: 02 670-8855
Visitor Info

Tickets

Buy Tickets

Purchase tickets online to the Museum and events Full-cost tickets may be purchased online or at the box office. Please note that discount tickets for children and youth, students, seniors, disabled visitors, IDF soldiers, National Service personnel, repeat visits within three months, and Jerusalem Resident cardholders are available only at the box office.
Free admission in August

Free admission for children until the age of 17 on Tuesdays and Saturdays (not for groups and does not include performances and workshops)

Tickets

NIS

Adults

 54

Students

 39

Children and teens (aged 5 to 17)  Free on Tues and Sat  (except groups and workshops)

 27

Senior Citizen (Upon presentation of official Israeli Ezrach Vatik or International ID)
(Cannot be purchased online)

 27

Disabled

 27

Soldier / National Service (Upon presentation of suitable ID)

Free

Repeat Visit (within 3 months) (No double discounts)

 27

Jerusalem Resident Cardholder

 46

Leumi 1+1 cardholders, Discount on tickets purchased in advance on the Leumi Card website, (No double discounts)
Isracard customers 50% discount, Code must be downloaded from the Isracard app/site, (No double discounts)

Please note: Tickets to the Museum are valid for two years from the date of purchase.
For information about special cultural events and purchasing tickets online »
Free audio guide for hearing impaired visitors included with all tickets. Group visits for people with special needs »

Terms and conditions
  • Tickets may be purchased online only at full cost for adults
  • Collection of tickets is conditional upon presentation of the credit card used to purchase the tickets
  • A ticket is valid until the stub is torn from the ticket or until the bar code is scanned at the entrance to the Museum
  • A ticket is valid only for one admission and one reentry on the day of the visit
  • There are no multiple discounts
  • Admission tickets to the Museum do not include admission to events, performances, or workshops to which additional fees are charged
  • Possession of an admission ticket only permits the visitor to enter the Museum campus 
  • Tickets may be collected at the ticket office or at automated ticket vendors, located at the Museum Entrance Pavilion

European Art

The collection of the Israel Museum’s Department of European Art spans the period from the 15th to the late 19th century, representing several of the  nations of Europe. It comprises paintings on wood and canvas; sculptures in marble, bronze, and ivory; porcelain; silverware; tapestries; and textiles.   

Over the years, the department’s holdings have steadily grown in scope, and they were substantially enriched in recent years by gifts of a number of masterworks, among them The Destruction and Sack of the Temple of Jerusalem by Nicolas Poussin (lost for over two centuries and only rediscovered in 1995); The Death of Adonis by Peter Paul Rubens; and St. Peter in Prison by Rembrandt van Rijn. The following paintings are exhibited in the department’s permanent collection: works by Dutch artists such as the Cuyps, Jan Victors, Pieter Lastman, the school of Hieronymus Bosch, and Anthony van Dyck; Italian artists such as Bernardo Strozzi and Bartolomeo Bettera; French artists such as Dominique Ingres; German artists such as Lucas Cranach the younger; Spanish artists such as Jusepe de Ribera; and English artists such as Thomas Lawrence and George Romney. Recurrent themes are stories from the Bible, the New Testament, and classical mythology, scenes from everyday life, still lifes, landscapes, and portraits.   

Also under the care of the department are three period rooms. An 18th-century French salon, designed and furnished in the Rococo style, was brought in its entirety from Paris; a small anteroom leading into it presents a display of porcelain from the late 18th and early 19th centuries. The 18th-century Venetian sitting room reveals the influence of China on Venetian art and design in that period. The English dining room reflects the style of the aristocratic country house in the latter part of the eighteenth century.  


Period Rooms

Period Rooms

European art galleries display, alongside artworks of the period, three period rooms: a sitting room, a dining room and a small room that was adjacent to a ballroom. These rooms offer a glimpse of the houses of 18th century nobility and social elite, and a taste of the dominant aesthetics of the private sphere where guests were received.

This room is one of the most resplendent examples of an 18th-century French salon outside of France. Its carved wall panels, furniture, paintings, and decorative objects were culled from various residences and assembled here to recreate the aesthetic surroundings in which members of the nobility and haute bourgeoisie lived and entertained their guests over two hundred years ago, before the French Revolution of 1789. The room is a faithful rendition of the regnant/accepted taste of time and is part of a new socio-cultural phenomenon in 18th-century Paris, when the Grand Salon drew circles of educated people who gathered in the homes of the nobility to socialize and feast.

The Venetian Room, also from the 18th century, was created in "chinoiserie" style, which means Western imitation of Chinese style. This taste in furnishing and decoration conquered Europe in the 18th century and reflected the attraction of the West to the exotic.

The carved, lacquered, and gilt Rococo paneling of this room – which may have served as an intimate corner adjacent to the ballroom in a Venetian palace – is decorated with Chinoiserie: exotic and colorful plants, flowers, and birds and Oriental scenes painted in the pseudo-Chinese style that swept through Europe in the 18th century. The ceiling of this room features stucco ornamentation in its four corners and the floor is adorned with a typically Venetian design In the niches are papier-mâché figures of a Chinese man and woman with nodding heads, also made in Venice during the 18th century. The design of the carved and painted wooden candelabrum with clock hanging from the ceiling has been attributed to one of the members of the Tiepolo family of Venetian artists. Together with the period furniture, all these elements faithfully recreate the atmosphere of a palace room in 18th-century Venice.

The third room is an English dining room, with a table set according to the traditional style predominant in British nobility homes at the time. The dining room displays fine examples of all the styles of the period in England. A pair of gilt side tables on either side of the doorway and the chandelier, show Baroque style that prevailed in the early part of the century. Characteristics of Rococo – a flamboyant style comprising scrolls and foliage often arranged asymmetrically, which held sway in England between 1745 and 1765 – are evident in the mirror over the mantelpiece, the tall pier glass, the pair of girandoles by the windows, and the dining chairs. The long side table and many of the important pieces of silver represent the Neoclassical style that closed off the century.

 Shlomit Steinberg, Hans Dichand Senior Curator of European Art